foodie

Kitchen Stories: Perfect Roast Beef

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Ingredients

1.5 kg quality topside of beef
2 medium onions
2 carrots
2 sticks celery
1 bulb garlic
1 small bunch fresh thyme, rosemary, bay or sage, or a mixture
olive oil
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

Method

To prepare your beef:
Take your beef out of the fridge 30 minutes before it goes into the oven. Preheat your oven to 240°C/475°F/ gas 9. There’s no need to peel the vegetables – just give them a wash and roughly chop them. Break the garlic bulb into cloves, leaving them unpeeled.

Pile all the veg, garlic and herbs into the middle of a large roasting tray and drizzle with olive oil. Drizzle the beef with olive oil and season well with salt and pepper, rubbing it all over the meat. Place the beef on top of the vegetables.

To cook your beef:
Place the roasting tray in the preheated oven. Turn the heat down immediately to 200°C/400°F/gas 6 and cook for 1 hour for medium beef. If you prefer it medium-rare, take it out 5 to 10 minutes earlier. For well done, leave it in for another 10 to 15 minutes.

If you’re doing roast potatoes and veggies, this is the time to crack on with them – get them into the oven for the last 45 minutes of cooking. Baste the beef halfway through cooking and if the veg look dry, add a splash of water to the tray to stop them burning.

When the beef is cooked to your liking, take the tray out of the oven and transfer the beef to a board to rest for 15 minutes or so. Cover it with a layer of tinfoil and a tea towel and put aside while you make your gravy, horseradish sauce and Yorkshire puddings.

Read more at http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef-recipes/perfect-roast-beef/#ERwP0icILF2sd91M.99

To Kampua or not to Kampua?

@smileykisses is an avid foodie (plus an Instagram addict to boot), so in our new segment “Cafe Culture 101″ she shares with us the good, the yummy and the blown minds of cafes and places to eat in Kuching!
Follow her online journey on Instagram at @smileykisses

Kampua mee; which means dry plate noodles in Foochow, is one of Sarawak local kopitiam dish originally  from Sibu along side Kolo mee. It can be ‘devoured’ for breakfast, lunch, teatime, dinner or even supper as long as it is available in any kopitiam.

Kampua mee originated from the Foochow people of Sarawak; the noodle is handmade and softer than Kuching’s famous Kolo mee. This is to absorb all the pork lard and onion oil sauce on the plate. In addition to that, you can have it black or white meaning there is added  soy sauce to make it black gives it a saltier aroma which is a totally different taste to the white version; the original Kampua mee.

To excite your taste buds here are some of the kampua’s that I often enjoy for breakfast :

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Fork & Knife Restaurant and Rusty Bean & Batter Review by @smileykisses

 

 

 

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@smileykisses is an avid foodie (plus an Instagram addict to boot), so in our new segment “Cafe Culture 101″ she shares with us the good, the yummy and the blown minds of cafes and places to eat in Kuching!
Follow her online journey on Instagram at @smileykisses
 
jan cafe review 1
 
jan cafe review 3Fork & Knife is a Halal Restaurant that serves casual dining cuisine. The food is pretty great and also pretty affordable! However, it can get pretty busy so best to call ahead and make a reservation.
 
 
 
jan cafe review 2
There is a new urban cafe in town and it serves Western styled desserts. The cafe has the ambiance and atmosphere that’s perfect to chill out with friends, but keep in mind that they are on the pricey side of things!